Tag Archives: Scott K Wilder

Digital Transformation Dialogues – Part 4 – Creating the Right Culture around Collaboration Tools

[Here’s more from my ongoing dialogue with transformation expert and friend Scott K Wilder. In the last post, we discussed ways to make an older workforce more digitally savvy. Scott ended that post with this: “Personally, I would rather be HipChatted vs. Slacked. But technology sometimes like religion. You have to find out what people are most comfortable with. At Marketo, it was Slack. At Salesforce, it is Chatter. For me, I prefer to be Skyped!. How about you?”]

GA: I’m a reluctant video user. I was always the kid who liked to sit in the very back of the class hunched down behind somebody who played Right Guard on the football team. That being said, I have some issues with chat too. It’s a very interruptive technology. I know that’s it’s super popular with developers – and I see the point particularly in Agile teams. But I always viewed serious code writing as essentially monastic. That may seem ludicrous, but writing large scale software is a real intellectual undertaking – requiring you to hold hundreds of thousands of lines of code in your head and have at least a general sense of how they fit together and what’s there. I’m not convinced you can do that while you’re regularly dropping in and out of chat sessions (or, for that matter, having meetings every 30 minutes). When I was writing large-scale code I pretty much talked to no one. Of course, a vanishingly tiny percentage of people are writing serious code. But I feel the same way about writing – something I do regularly. When I’m writing a piece I care about, I seriously don’t want to be interrupted. So my question really is about protecting culture – you’ve talked about adoption – and creating a culture of usage. I agree that’s important – in fact it’s a far more common failure point. Life being what it is, though, we also have to worry about too much success (and part of adoption is assuring people that culture won’t change too much – even if it will). So how do you create an etiquette culture around collaborative technologies that protects other types of behavior we value? After all, no company wants the family equivalent of everyone whipping out their iPhones at the dinner table…

SW: Ah, now we are getting into a little psychology and ethnography. For me, there are two ways to approach this (business) issue:

  1. Constantly try to understand the different personalities in your company
  2. Consistently establish and communicate company values throughout the organization

In every organization, there are many personality types. Each responds to new challenges in different ways, especially when it comes to adopting new technologies. Individual or team behaviors can be looked at through a Myers Briggs lens. Or you can examine various personas involved.

Ironically, 80% of companies do market segmentation with personas or some other kind approach, but few take the time to do the same thing when trying to figure out how to work with their own employees. Few companies step back and look at the different ways their own people adopt technology. There is often little conversation about how new processes and technologies diffuse throughout an organization. So what’s my point about all of this psycho mumbo jumbo.

Before you can create a culture around the adoption of a new technology, you need to understand the different personality types in your organization. And it helps if you leverage a topography like Myers Briggs, to help understand how people learn or adopt new technologies.

For example some people might prefer to learn on their own either studying a user manual or watching videos before kicking the tires and testing out a new product. Others might prefer to learn with a mentor or teacher to guide them. And others might want to learn by participating with others. The important thing is to first understand how an individual responds and adapt to new ways of doing business.

After you know the different types of people/personalities you are dealing with, you can begin to focus a culture that fosters the adoption of new technologies while protecting people’s values (or how they want to start using the new technology).

Finally, the challenge is getting these different types of people to function on a day-to-day basis with each other. This will be easier if you have provide a comfortable and safe environment for them to learn at their own speed and in their own way.

Secondly, when creating an etiquette culture around collaborative technologies, it’s important to present them to your employees by showing how they map to your core company values (This assumes you have company values). Atlassian, my current employer, has very strong values which are reviewed every time the company works on a project. Some of them include:

  • Don’t #@!% the customer: This statement promotes honesty and transparency. The company knows that their Customers are their lifeblood. Without happy customers, they are doomed
  • Play, as a team: As they say “We spend a huge amount of our time at work. So the more that time doesn’t feel like “work,” the better. We can be serious, without taking ourselves too seriously. We strive to put what’s right for the team first – whether in a meeting room or on a football pitch.”

These are just two of the values. There are others, but each one is used to help keep every employee aligned and heading towards the company’s True North, especially when adopting a new collaborative technology or trying to change behavior across the organization.

Finally, collaboration has no beginning nor end It is a continuous journey that involves multiple parts of your organization.

GA: There’s a lot here to respond to. I’m totally on board with your thoughts around corporate culture and values. Most companies pretend to have values – some actually do. And while I’ve argued in some other cases that you can drive analytics without necessarily having top-down support (though it sure does help), culture building is either hierarchic or anarchic – and anarchic rarely works as a model. That isn’t to say that individual managers can’t create micro-cultures inside a larger organization. They do – and pretty constantly. But those micro-cultures – for good or ill – are always getting worn down and eroded by the broader culture. There’s no place where the impact of senior folks is more pronounced than on setting the tone for this kind of culture building – and, as I’ve argued elsewhere, culture building isn’t done with words. In the beginning was the deed! You can talk “Don’t #@!% the customertill you’re blue in the face, but the first time an executive makes a decision to the contrary, all that talk will be less than worthless (and I do mean less since it creates negative value in the company). That’s one good reason why it’s important to have values you A) actually care about and B) can reasonably live up to.

I’m less comfortable with tests like Myers-Briggs for employee segmentation. I’ve never been confident that personality tests capture anything real. I know they have a lot of fans (and a lot of fans among people whose opinions I respect) – but I’m unconvinced. Sure, we all see ourselves in the results of these tests. But we see ourselves in our horoscopes too. Self identification isn’t objective verification. But I’ll give you the validity of personality types and still question whether it’s a good tool to help drive cultural adoption (and proper etiquette) around social technologies. I’ll buy that segmentation would bring something to crafting a change management and adoption strategy – but would I use personality types or would I use things like rank, role, and behavior?

Convince me if you can!

Finally, let’s talk technology. I’d love to get your thoughts on what types of collaborative technologies make the biggest difference in an organization. And I’d also like your thoughts on whether that’s even the right question. Do you need to think about a collaborative suite? Will one tool likely die on the vine where a constellation of tools might work? I’ve seen both approaches fail – but that’s never conclusive. We live in a “baseball” world where failure is always the most common outcome.

 

Digital Transformation Dialogues – Part 3 – Bringing an Older Workforce up to Speed and Driving Adoption of Digital Tools

[Here’s more from my ongoing dialogue with transformation expert and friend Scott K Wilder. In the last post, we discussed the role of Millennials in balancing an older workforce. But I wanted a little more detail on how to get an older workforce more digitally aware…]

SW: I probably forgot this one because I am an older guy, but I’m also someone who thinks it’s every marketer’s responsibility to learn digital technology. Before I directly answer the question, let me give you an example. My son is really into drones and wants me to take him to some national parks so he can fly his drone. Before I make a road trip with him, however, I want to master drones, so I hired a drone coach. After all, I am the one who is ultimately responsible for my son’s safety. Working at as a Digital Marketer or Digital Employee requires the same commitment. The only difference, however, is that companies need to play a bit of the parental role and provide a clear path for their employees to learn about technology.

This can be done by paying for courses (Marketo, my former employer, pays for its employees to take courses at Lynda.com). It can be done by making ‘learning certain technologies’ as required for the job. Instead of saying you learn it or you lose it (your job), position this change as an opportunity to skill up — and that the company is investing in the future (in its best asset, its employees).

Companies also should provide career guidance — either for older employees to find other opportunities within their company or with a company’s partner. Training, career guidance are not only great retention tools, but also build loyalty after an employee moves on.

Companies also need to gently require that digital technologies be used in their everyday business practices. If the older person wants to remain part of the company, they will have to hop on the digital bus. And like the Magic School Bus (a book my kid loves), it will be a journey into unknown — with lots of opportunity to learn, a bit of uncertainty and a fun adventure. You know what. Even outside the office, they will feel as if they are on the Magic School Bus because by learning technology, older folks can have a more enriched life. My son Facetimes and Skypes with his Grandma twice a week.

Why should companies do this? Why should they make this investment? Several reasons, such as older workers tend to be loyal, older workers already know ‘your business’. Companies should also build incentive systems — gamify their career development — so they will be motivated to take on the exciting challenge of improving their skills.

Final note: Being Digital is more than just using the internet and Facebook. Companies should also figure out what digital technologies will help these older workers do their job better. If they need to be on social media, teach them Hootsuite. If they need to manage email programs, teach them Autopilot or Exact Target. If they need to collaborate better, be their guide while they learn Slack or HipChat.

GA: There’s a couple of points that I want to particularly call-out there. One is that company’s aren’t taking full advantage of the explosion in high-quality educational courseware that’s available these days. Sure, lots of folks will do this on their own, but not everyone is sufficiently motivated. I’ve always said my number one guiding principal – and the reason transformation is so hard – is that EVERYONE IS FUNDAMENTALLY LAZY. Giving people real incentives and formal guidance on courseware so that it’s part of an employee’s basic career development is really easy to do and I think pays tremendous dividends. If your company hasn’t curated public courseware for specific career-tracks and incentivized your employees to take advantage, you should be kicking your HR team’s butt (just my humble opinion).

I’m also a huge fan of the idea (as you know) that people have to DO stuff. And I’m glad you brought up the technologies because that’s the next (and last) area I wanted to explore. A lot of the digital technologies are fundamentally collaborative. But that can make adoption critical to their success. I know you’ve been living this problem – how do you get a team (and keep my older, non-digital workers in mind) to adopt tools like Slack?

SW: Gary, why are you always asking me the hard questions? I think you ‘re correct in focusing on ‘the team’ vs. ‘the company’ and trying to mandate day 1 that a whole company start using something like Slack.

They key is to start with one group.  Pick a team that seems receptive to taking on new ways of doing things — especially when it comes to digital technology. And within that group, you should also identify a few key digital change agents, early adopters, who are willing to not only try out the new technology, but also be champions for it.

Create a program for these digital champions. It can be rewards focused, but even better,  show them how sharing their knowledge and experience will help them learn a new technology even better and make them more marketable. Intuit, where I spent almost a full decade, has a philosophy called “Learn Teach Learn.” The only way to really learn something is to teach it to others (Intuit has a great learning culture!).

Of course, there is another option. You could see if any group in the company is currently using Slack and make them that group ‘your change agents. At Marketo, it was actually the company’s commuters — employees who took a small shuttle bus that looked like one of those vans old age homes use to transport its frail residents – who started using Slack. They let their fellow workers know if they wanted the bus to wait for them or if they wanted the van to turn around and pick up someone they forgot. My group of commuters called our Slack group, The Purple Lobster.

The Slack group was called the Purple Lobster because that’s what we called the van. We picked purple because that was Marketo’s company color. And lobster because it wasn’t the fastest moving vehicle on Highway 101.

And like a lobster slithering in the sand (sorry about pushing the poetic envelop here) slowly, but surely ,other commuting groups started to using Slack. Eventually, product teams started using it And finally, the CTO and his team made the call to not fight the crowd and force the company to use another tool, like Chatter. Instead, CIO convinced his fellow executives to adopt Slack across the company. It was a brilliant ‘if you can’t beat them, then join them’ strategy.

If you identify a group using Slack, challenge them to go completely cold Turkey. See if they are willing to only use Slack only (no email) for a week or so. At Atlassian, I had my hand Slacked when I tried to send an email to someone with a simple question. They recommended I use their Slack like product, Hipchat. And now, I only have 20 emails in my inbox. How many of you have only 20 emails in your corporate email inbox?

If you are not so lucky to find early adopters, you need to find a group of people who are most like to use the new technology. If there are some older folks on the team, pair them up with the younger wipper snappers. Or provide some training.

The key in all this is not to focus on technology. Instead, treat the change to Slack or any other digital technology as a change management exercise. Focus on adoption — education, onboarding and engagement. None of this should be done in a vacuum. You need someone to shepherd the process. Someone who can be a guide, a teacher, a problem solver and yes, a true change agent.

Other considerations include rewarding people for their efforts and successes. Gamify the process! In doing so, make sure to acknowledge people’s efforts for trying. Don’t make the same mistake most schools make and only pass people for knowing the answer. As Carol Dweck, well known motivational researcher,  points out, children praised for hard work chose problems that promised increased learning (vs. just getting the right answer). This also applies to adults. Really!

The key here is to alter someone’s mindset. Instead of rewarding (just giving them a bonus) or punishing someone (not promoting them) for adopting a new technology, recognize their effort and hard work. The end result will be they might adopt taking on new challenges and succeeding at them. Even if it means learning and using something like Slack.

Finally good old training is important. It always amazes me how many companies introduce a new technology and offer one time training. Usually during a three hour class. If you are licensing a technology like Slack, see if they can conduct monthly webinars to answer questions (if not, you offer it). Also have videos and Q&As available for your staff.

Personally, I would rather be HipChatted vs. Slacked. But technology sometimes like religion. You have to find out what people are most comfortable with. At Marketo, it was Slack. At Salesforce, it is Chatter. For me, I prefer to be Skyped!. How about you?

Digital Transformation Dialogues – Part 2

(Resuming my dialog with transformation expert – and friend – Scott K Wilder). Scott had touched on the challenge an older workforce presents to digital transformation and the need to embrace Millennial Leaders…)

GA: I see this all the time. In fact, I’d venture to suggest that there might be a pretty strong positive correlation between the average age of your workforce and the perceived need for digital transformation. But this seems really hard to change. Good luck attracting young digital talent to a company that skews older AND is poor at digital. I also see challenges in adaptation. I argued that when you select a digital leader for transformation it’s important – even vital – to get someone who isn’t just experienced in cutting edge digital. They need to have experienced the pain of transformation to be effective in that role. But I see potentially similar problems trying to integrate younger employees into your workforce. I could see where they would just get frustrated. Obviously, though, this has to be done. Thoughts on how to smooth this? And thoughts about making an older workforce more digital in a fairly effective manner?

SW: Having younger individuals in your company is important for a true digital transformation. But don’t just hire them because they are less expensive than the older workers. Hire them because of how comfortable they are with technology and their desire to learn.

To smooth things out, first I would focus on what Millennials want in their career and / or what do they want to get out of their work. They have a tremendous desire to learn. Yes, it’s not just about achieving for them. Reminder: Creating a learning culture is an important way to transforming a company.

Therefore, during an interview process or an onboarding process, I would ask them:

– where do they see themselves in a year (none of this three year or five years stuff)

– what skills do they think they need to learn or acquire (maybe you, the hiring manager, help guide them towards an answer by sharing what skills are required for this)

– how can you (their manager support them)

Reminder: Find out their goals and aspirations before they start working

A big mistake companies make is that they never even consider asking these questions.

I would also look beyond the hiring manager or group. I would find a younger employee a mentor, who is outside the group they work in and who is not part of their of their everyday team (even if it is a cross-functional team). I would find someone who can be a good sounding board for the individual. In fact, I would have the person interview 2-3 potential guides or mentors. Let them feel like they are part of the process. Reminder: Assign them a mentor and Don’t just assign everything to a Millennial. (OK, that’s two reminders)

Establish toll-gates or check-ins with the younger employee. Part of creating a learning culture is to have an open and continuous feedback loop. Reminder: Check in with your younger employees even if there’s a manager that separates you and them.!

Younger people today are passionate about causes. So figure out if there’s a way to tie your digital transformation to a higher cause (or even calling). If you are T-Mobile, for example, can you use your technology to help people in less developered countries get better access to telecommunications (Maybe be part of Google or Facebooks’s Internet Satellite projects). Reminder: Define and share your cause!

And somewhat related to the ‘cause’ calling, make sure your company has a clear mission. People, in general, respond better when they know where the company’s True North lies — what the company is trying to accomplish. Final Reminder: If you really want to smooth things out and integrate younger employees into your digital transformation, make them a part of the journey from the beginning.

GA: This is great stuff. I’ve always been a little skeptical of generational theories – but there really are some noticeable differences with Millennials. It’s also, I think, a matter of our times. We talk about Millennials, for example, being passionate about causes – and I’ve certainly seen that. In general, though, I think it’s true more generally these days – not necessarily that people are more passionate about their causes  – but that they are more willing to cross work with other things and are less determined to have a work life and a non-work life which never shall meet. When you can get people to bring that extra passion to their work it’s a pretty big win.

But you dodged one aspect of my question (or at least sinned by omission) – what about getting older works more attuned to digital? In some ways, I think that’s a more important and interesting problem…

Digital Transformation Dialogs

I’m going to wrap up this extended series on digital transformation with a back-and-forth dialog with an old friend of mine. I’ve known Scott K. Wilder since the early days of Web Analytics. He’s been an industry leader helping companies build communities, adapt to an increasingly social world, and drive digital transformation. In some of this current work, Scott has been working with companies to adopt collaborative working suites for their customers, partners and employees – which I think is a huge part of internal digital transformation. So I thought a conversation on the pitfalls and challenges might be interesting and useful.

GA: We all see these hype-cycle trends and right now there’s a lot of interest in digital transformation at the enterprise level. I think that’s driven by the fact that most large enterprises have tried pretty seriously for a while now to get better at digital and are frustrated with the results. Do you agree?

SW: Good question.

When you read white papers about the latest trends in the enterprise space, most of them highlight the importance of each company being digital transformed. This usually means leaving a legacy approach or operation and instead leveraging a new approach or business model that embraces technology.

Unfortunately, most companies fail when they undertake this endeavor. Sometimes they fail because just pay lip service to this initiative, never do anything beyond placing the goal of ‘going digital’ on a powerpoint slide they give a company All-Hands (I have witnessed this first hand). And sometimes, they just test out bunch of different programs without thinking through desired outcomes. (They throw a lot of virtual stuff against the internet wall hoping that something sticks).

Undergoing a Digital Transformation means many things to many people. It can imply focusing more on the customer. Or it can mean enabling employees collaborate better together. At the end of the day, however, a company needs to first focus on one simple end state. One change in behavior! Rather than trying to boil the whole ocean at once and try to do implement massive digital transformation across an organization, it’s better to start with a  simple project, try to leverage technology to accomplish a desired outcome, learn from the experience and then share the success with other parts of the organization

Start first with a relatively simple goal. And if you really want to change an organization, see if you can get employees volunteer to be your soldiers in arms and then closely work with them to define what digital success looks like. It could be as something getting employees to digitalize their interaction with each other more  or leveraging technology to improve a VOC process. Whatever it is. Start with one project.

Here’s one approach. Once the goal is to define, then ask for volunteers to work on figuring out how to achieve the desired outcome. No digital program or initiative is going to be successful without employee buy – in and involvement, so it behooves CEOs to find a bunch of enthusiastic volunteers to figure out the ‘how’ (If you remember you calculus Y = (x)x Senior managers can decide on the Y, and then let their team figure out the X or inputs.

Digital Transformations often fail because:

  • Executives often decide their company goals and then impose their approach on the employees. Digital Transformation initiatives also fail because CEOs want to change whole culture overnight. Unfortunately, however, they often forget Rome was not built in day. Even though a true Digital Transformation is often a journey, it is also important to start simple. Very simple!
  • There’s no buy in at the mid-level ranks in the company
  • There’s no True North or desired goal
  • There’s too much attention on the technology and not the cultural impact.

I have read articles that tell you true cultural change can only happen if you eliminate political infighting, distribute your decision making, etc. While all of that is important, it will require gutting your organization, laying off a lot of people and hand-picking new hires if you want to change things quickly.

To truly change a culture, however start simple. Pick a goal. Ask for employees to volunteer to work on it (take other work off their plate so they don’t have to work after house). Ask them to to involve leveraging digital technologies. Give the team room to succeed or fail.  Most importantly, be their guide along the way.

Once this small team completes their project, celebrate their success in front of others in the company. Have them highlight how they leveraged technology.

Once this group is successful, anoint each team member to be a digital transformation ambassador and have them then move into other groups of the organization and share their learnings, experiences, etc.

GA: I’m a big believer in the idea that to change culture you have to change behavior – that means doing things not talking about them. I like the idea of a targeted approach – huge organizational changes are obviously incredibly risky. That being said, I feel like most of what you’ve talked about could be applied to any kind of transformation project – digital or otherwise. I’m not disagreeing with that, but I’m curious if you agree that digital presents some unique challenges to the large enterprise. And if you do agree, what are those challenges and do they change/drive any aspects of a transformation strategy?

SW: There are definitely challenges in driving any type of transformative change in an enterprise environment. Here’s a list of challenges preventing a smooth adoption of digital technologies or hindering the ability to digitally transform an organization

As they say. It’s hard to teach an old dog new tricks. Companies get stuck in their old ways of doing things. For example, even though companies are testing the waters with Slack and Hipchat, two great collaborative platforms, few have made any progress in being weaned (a bit) off of email. For example, we all complain about email but refuse to reduce how often we use it). Part of the problem is the result is that those individuals, who are tasked with driving change in the organization actually tend to be the biggest resisters to change. The IT department, who I will pick on here, usually are decision makers and keepers of the digital platform budgets do not want to try something new. (Marketing is slowly getting more say here, but most marketing leads don’t understand new technologies). So IT and even Marketing wait as long as possible to make a decision about adopting newer collaborative technologies, such as Slack or Hipchat. And while they are doing an elaborate evaluation process, today’s tech savvy staff often just jumps in and starts using the latest and greatest technologies. They don’t ask for permission first. This was the case at Marketo with Slack. First, a small group of employees starting using it and soon others jumped in. There was resistance at the highest parts of the company. Eventually, IT, however had no choice and how to follow the wisdom of the crowd. Survey Monkey also started out this way. There are other challenges as well. Solution: Companies need do a better job at knowing understanding what tools their teams want to use and why they want to use them. If the troops are using Google Docs, for example, management needs to embrace this and not try and force their way (in this case, the Microsoft Office 365 way) down the throats of their employees. If there are security concerns, figure out a solution.

GA: I’ll just note that in many ways this reflects my discussion of a Reverse Hierarchy of Understanding in organizations

…What else?

SW:   Data and Privacy Issues: Companies, rightly so, are always concerned about data leakage, data security and privacy issues. Enterprises, especially the public ones and the ones in important transaction industries like Finance or Health Care, have to be sensitive to how data is shared within an organization. Solution: If an organization wants to adopt a newer technology, management needs to do more research in how other companies adopt newer technology while protecting their company secrets. Few companies develop breakthrough technologies and systems that they are the first to try something new. Probably someone has already created a similar service or implemented a similar technology. They have probably already dealt with similar issues. I am not saying just copy what they did but rather learn from their mistakes. Or what they did well.

An older workforce: A third challenge is that many enterprises attract an older workforce and/or are not sure how to integrate millennials into their organization. As I pointed out in my book, Millennial Leaders, it’s important to embrace a younger workforce and place these individuals on teams where they can help advise key decision makers. Younger employees are more likely to adopt new approaches, new technologies and new ways of doing things. Solution: Bring millennials into digital related conversations sooner than later. While decision making can still be top down, it’s important to give these younger folks a voice.

GA: Okay – I know you have more thoughts on this but I’m going to stop right there because I know you’re an expert on this Millennial stuff and I want to delve into it a bit. But that’s probably a discussion for Post #2…