Tag Archives: in-store customer journey data

Using In-Store Customer Journey Data: Associate Optimzation

If store layout/merchandising and promotion planning are the core applications for in-store customer journey measurement, staff optimization is their neglected and genius offspring. For most retail stores, labor costs are a huge part of overall operating expenses – typically around 15% of sales. And staff interactions are profoundly determinate of customer satisfaction. In countless analytic efforts around customer satisfaction and churn, the one constant driver of both is the quality of associate interactions. People matter.

The human factor is a huge part of the customer journey. Some in-store measurement solutions treat staff interactions the way digital solutions treat employee visits – as data to be culled out and discarded. The only thing worse is when they leave them in and don’t differentiate between customer and staff!

No part of the customer journey and no part of the store has a bigger impact on the journey, on the sale, and on the brand satisfaction than interactions with your sales associates. And, of course, labor costs are one of the biggest cost drivers at the store. So optimizing staff is critical on every front: revenue optimization, customer satisfaction and cost management. It’s rare that a single point of analysis drives across all three with so much impact, highlighting how important associate optimization really is.

With staff data integrated into customer journey measurement, you know how often associate interactions occurred, you know how long they lasted, and you know how often they resulted in sales. Some stores will already track at least some of this as part of their incentive programs, but customer journey data provides a true measure of opportunity and productivity. Some of these data points are straightforward, but there are interesting aspects to staffing data that go beyond basic conversion effectiveness. It’s possible, for example, to isolate the number and impact of cases where staff interactions should have happened but didn’t. It’s also possible to understand optimal contact strategies, answering questions like ‘how long should a customer be in a section before a contact becomes desirable or imperative? ‘  Even more interesting is the opportunity to bring sports-driven team and player metrics to bear on the problems of staffing. You can understand which associate combinations work best together, how valuable team cohesion is, and the value spread between a top associate and an average hire. This is all invaluable data when it comes time to plan out schedules and staffing levels and, when paired with weather data, can also be used to optimized staffing plans on a highly local basis.

Finally, there are deep opportunities to use this data to optimize broader aspects of staff optimization. By integrating Voice of Employee (VoE) data with associate effectiveness, you can hone in on the golden questions that will help you identify the best possible hires. Creating a measurement-driven, closed loop system to optimize associate hiring decisions isn’t what people generally think of when they evaluate in-store measurement. But it’s a unique and powerful use of the technology to drive competitive advantage.

 

Questions you can Answer

  • Are there days/times when a store is over/under staffed?
  • Are there better options of positioning staff?
  • What’s the best way to optimize staffing teams and placements?
  • How much does training impact staff performance?
  • What questions should I ask when I hire new staff to identify potential stars?
  • How successful is any given associate in converting opportunities?
  • What’s the right amount of dwell-time to allow a customer prior to an associate interaction?

To find out more about retail analytics and in-store customer journey tracking, check out my new company’s site: DigitalMortar.com

The Uses of In-store Customer Journey Data – Store Marketing

I’m working my way through the broad uses of in-store customer journey optimization. I started with Store Layout and Merchandising optimization – which is really the foundational analytic capability that this type of data provides. Today, I’ll tackle a use that’s nearly as fundamental – optimizing in-store promotions. For those of you from the digital world, you can think of these two applications as parallel to site optimization and digital marketing optimization.

Promotion Planning

In-store promotion planning is one of those constant grinds in the life of retail analysis. You never stop planning promotions and you never get good enough. With PoS data, it’s pretty easy to measure the single most important aspect of a promotion – how much it sold. It can be a lot harder, however, to answer questions about why something worked or, as is often more salient, why something didn’t. In-store measurement can fill in the gaps around performance measurement AND help develop new promotion and display strategies.

With in-store journey measurement, you can track how and whether a promotion shifted behavior. Did a promotion steer visitors to a section? Did it keep them there longer? Did it drive key milestones like staff interaction or dressing room decisions? With only PoS data, you can easily misunderstand what drove a promotion’s apparent effectiveness. Almost as important, in-store journey measurement provides unique insight into how a promotion cannibalized shopping behaviors and generated new opportunities. When you change navigation patterns in the store, you ALWAYS cannibalize some behaviors and you nearly always disadvantage some sections/products. You also create new opportunities and traffic corridors that might present additional optimization or promotion opportunities. Understanding how cannibalization and redirection worked and whether or not their impact outweighed the promotion benefits is essential to developing sound long term strategies.

And it’s not all about the customer. In digital analytics, we didn’t have to worry much about compliance issues. What you pushed to the website is what was on the website. With dozens, hundreds or thousands of stores to manage, though, pushing content and making sure it’s consistent and correctly deployed is no joke. In-store customer journey measurement provides a strong behavioral compliance check. When a promotion drives specific patterns of behavior, it’s easy to see which stores are roughly following the pattern and which aren’t – given you near real-time feedback on potential compliance issues.

 

Questions you can Answer

  • Why did a promotion work better or worse than expected?
  • How did promotions localize and were there stores that didn’t “play along”?
  • How much opportunity did promotions have to influence shopping?
  • How successful were shoppers who were exposed to the promotion?
  • Did the promotion create new “impulse” opportunities?
  • Did the promotion cannibalize other areas/products and to what extent?
  • For a potential promotion, what are they placement areas that will drive exposure to the right shopping segments?
  • Were there stores that didn’t deploy or correctly implement a promotion?

Next up? A really powerful and oft-neglected aspect of customer journey measurement – staff optimization.