Tag Archives: customer journey

Customer Strategy for Retail – Using Analytics and Customer Journey Tracking

I’ve detailed five different ways that in-store customer journey tracking drives store improvement: from optimizing store merchandising to improving in-store digital experiences and tuning omni-channel visits. All are important and each can drive measurable ROI. But in-store customer journey also tracking has broad implications at the strategic level of your organization.  Everyone wants to be more customer focused. I hear that all the time. Over and over. I even agree. And if you’re delivering a physical experience to customers without adequate measurement, you’re not just delivering a sub-optimal experience, you’re missing out on an opportunity to drive customer-centric thinking deeper into your enterprise.

In organizations that take customer focus seriously, the key question isn’t what will maximize sales. It’s what does the customer like/want. Getting an organization to think that way isn’t easy and it’s not even always clear that it’s the right thing to do. I’ve seen plenty of cases where operations and sales people just roll their eyes at a customer-centric proposal – sure that the bottom-line impact will be unsustainable. I tend to shy away from absolutes. The world is a complex place and not every problem demands absolute customer focus regardless of cost. But I do know this; unless you take that customer question to heart, your customer journey exercises will fail. You really do have to care about the customer’s experience and you have to get used to thinking about it that way.

Analytics in general and in-store measurement tracking in particular is a powerful tool for driving customer-centricity. Customer experience issues aren’t captured in traditional ERP data. They don’t show up in our BI reports on product sales by SKU. They aren’t illuminated by marketing studies. To bring customer experience into focus in the organization, you need a set of tools that help the organization map, track, and study real customer experiences.

In physical measurement, store tracking systems aren’t the only tool in your customer experience toolkit (just as digital analytics tools aren’t the only tools in the digital world). Voice of Customer data, in particular, is a critical part of building customer-centric thinking and fueling both strategy and continuous improvement. For years now I’ve championed the integration of VoC data with behavioral data so that decision-makers can see and balance the trade-offs between hard goals (sales optimization) and soft goals (experience, branding, satisfaction). That’s every bit as true in physical retail as it is in eCommerce with the additional requirement that Voice of Employee becomes almost equally important.

You can’t craft and hone an effective customer journey strategy on the back of a one-time customer journey mapping consulting engagement. That doesn’t work. Part of real customer-centricity is realizing that the work of understanding and optimizing customer journeys never ends. It’s a continuous process that requires tools and organizational commitment.

But by bringing real-measurement of the in-store customer experience to your enterprise, you drive a whole new set of customer-centric questions and a fundamentally different approach to staying customer-focused into the enterprise. I spent the last few years prior to Digital Mortar helping drive enterprise digital transformation. It’s hard. But customer measurement is both a hammer and wedge into the organization; it’s one of the most effective tools around to drive organizational transformation.

Use it.

Questions you can Answer

  • What types of customer shopping experiences are there in the store?
  • How do those experiences change in nature or distribution by store type and region?
  • How do my traditional customer segments map to in-store behaviors?
  • How do loyal customer visits in-store differ from casual or non-loyal visits?
  • Are there customers who aren’t well served by the store layout?
  • Are we finding the right type of sales associate and is there incentive structure encouraging both sales and customer satisfaction?
  • Have we setup the store and store operations to minimize customer frustration?

To find out how Digital Mortar can help you improve your in-store experiences and drive transformation, drop us a line.

Omni-channel Analytics and In-store Customer Tracking

While digital experiences are just beginning to penetrate the physical store, the customer’s integration of digital and physical shopping behaviors is already robust. If you have bricks & mortar, you have to figure out how to use that fact to your advantage in delivering experience. That’s what omni-channel is all about. There have been a number of omni-channel retail initiatives in the past couple of years that were undeniably successful. Online to in-store pickup, flexible return, and store localized supply chains have become key ingredients to omni-channel success. But there’s a long way to go before those experiences are mature and optimized.

Not surprisingly, retailers have discovered (sometimes to their chagrin), that omni-channel initiatives have a real downside when it comes to store operations. If you’re staff is spending more time processing online returns, what happens to customer service and sales?

It’s all too easy to steal from Peter to pay Paul. You may be delivering great service to one customer while you’re simultaneously ignoring another. And the two facts may be deeply related. Unless you can measure what’s actually happening in store, you’ll consistently miss these types of interactions.

With in-store tracking technology, you can explore how those omni-channel initiatives are actually impacting store operations AND customer experience. You can track what customers do after a return or before a pickup. You can track the over-time behavior of omni-channel customers to understand the impact on loyalty. You can measure whether sales interactions increase, decrease and are changed by omni-channel duties. And there are at least a couple strategies for beginning to join the in-store customer experience to the digital world. That join is hard, but it allows you do better analysis of almost every aspect of your business. Even better, it opens up a world of new marketing opportunities.

If there’s any area of online display advertising that works, it’s re-marketing. With the store to digital join, you have the opportunity to do digital re-marketing based on in-store behavior. That’s taking show-rooming to a new (and better) level!

If you’re looking for a deep-dive into the single hottest area in modern retail and in-store customer analytics, check out this video introduction I put together. It provides a crisp, easy introduction to the ins-and-outs of omni-channel analytics with in-store customer data including the all-important digital to store join.

Questions you can Answer

  • How much do omni-channel initiatives impact store operations and sales interactions?
  • Are omni-channel tasks being handled by the right staff?
  • Are omni-channel customers significantly different in their store behaviors?
  • What are the best cross-sell and personalization opportunities around omni-channel visits?
  • How much can a digitally sourced visit be steered to traditional shopping without damaging the experience?
  • How omni-channel initiatives change the way the store layout functions and are their opportunities to advantage some kinds of promotions or products as a result?

The Strategic Uses of In-Store Customer Journey Measurement

Store layout, promotion and staff optimization are the immediate and obvious ways to use the core data from customer journey analytics. Together, they comprise the “you” part of the equation – optimizing your operational and marketing strategies. But the uses of in-store tracking don’t end there. There’s tremendous strategic value in being to understand customer journeys – a lesson we’ve learned over and over again in digital. When it comes to omni-channel, store and experience design, and the integration of new technologies to the store, you simply can’t do the job right without in-store journey measurement.

I cover the fundamentals of why the in-store journey matters and how to build in-store customer journey data in this new post on Digital Mortar.

 

Digital Transformation of the Enterprise (with a side of Big Data)

Since I finished Measuring the Digital World and got back to regular blogging, I’ve been writing an extended series on the challenges of digital in the enterprise. Like many analysts, I’m often frustrated by the way our clients approach decision-making. So often, they lack any real understanding of the customer journey, any effective segmentation scheme, any real method for either doing or incorporating analytics into their decisioning, anything more than a superficial understanding of their customers, and anything more than the empty façade of a testing program. Is it any surprise that they aren’t very good at digital? This would be frustrating but understandable if companies simply didn’t invest in these capabilities. They aren’t magic, and no large enterprise can do these things without making a significant investment. But, in fact, many companies have invested plenty with very disappointing results. That’s maddening. I want to change that – and this series is an extended meditation on what it takes to do better and how large enterprises might truly gain competitive advantage in digital.

I hope that reading these posts is useful to people, but I know, too, that it’s hard to get the time. Heaven knows I struggle to read the stuff I’d like to. So I took advantage of the slow time over the holidays to do something that’s been on my wish list for about 2 years now – take some of the presentations I do and turn them into full online webinars. I started with a whole series that captures the core elements of this series – the challenge of digital transformation.

There are two versions of this video series. The first is a set of fairly short (2-4 minute) stories that walk through how enterprise decision-making gets done, what’s wrong with the way we do it, and how we can do better. It’s a ten(!) part series and meant to be tackled in order. It’s not really all that long…like I said, most of the videos are just 2-4 minutes long. I’ve also packaged up the whole story (except Part 10) in single video that runs just a little over 20 minutes. It’s shorter than viewing all 10 of the others, but you need a decent chunk of uninterrupted time to get at it. If you’re really pressed and only want to get the key themes without the story, you can just view Parts 8-10.

Here’s the video page that has all of these laid out in order:

Digital Transformation Video Series

Check it out and let me know what you think! To me it seems like a faster, better, and more enjoyable way to get the story about digital transformation and I’m hoping it’s very shareable as well. If you’re struggling to get analytics traction in your organization, these videos might be an easy thing to share with your CMO and digital channel leads to help drive real change.

I have to say I enjoyed doing these a lot and they aren’t really hard to do. They aren’t quite professional quality, but I think they are very listenable and I’ll keep working to make them better. In fact, I enjoyed doing the digital transformation ones so much that I knocked out another this last week – Big Data Explained.

This is one of my favorite presentations of all time – it’s rich in content and intellectually interesting. Big data is a subject that is obscured by hype, self-interest, and just plain ignorance; everyone talks about it but no one has a clear, cogent explanation of what it is and why it’s important. This presentation deconstructs the everyday explanation about big data (the 4Vs) and shows why it misses the mark. But it isn’t designed to merely expose the hype, it actually builds out a clear, straightforward and important explanation of why big data is real, why it challenges common IT and analytics paradigms, and how to understand whether a problem is a big data problem…or not. I’ve written about this before, but you can’t beat a video with supporting visuals for this particular topic. It’s less than fifteen minutes and, like the digital transformation series, it’s intended for a wide audience. If you have decision-makers who don’t get big data or are skeptical of the hype, they’ll appreciate this straightforward, clear, and no-nonsense explication of what it is.

You can get it on my video page or direct on Youtube

This is also a significant topic toward the end of Measuring the Digital World where I try to lay out a forward looking plan for digital analytics as a discipline.

I’m planning to do a steady stream of these videos throughout the year so I’d love thoughts/feedback if you have suggestions!

Next week I hope to have an update on my EY Counseling Family’s work in the 538 Academy Awards challenge. We’ve built our initial Hollywood culture models – it’s pretty cool stuff and I’m excited to share the results. Our model may not be as effective as some of the other challengers (TBD), but I think it’s definitely more fun.

Analytics with a Strategic Edge

The Role of Voice of Customer in Enterprise Analytics

The vast majority of analytics effort is expended on problems that are tactical in nature. That’s not necessarily wrong. Tactics gets a bad rap, sometimes, but the truth is that the vast majority of decisions we make in almost any context are tactical. The problem isn’t that too much analytics is weighted toward tactical issues, it’s really that strategic decisions don’t use analytics at all. The biggest, most important decisions in the digital enterprise nearly always lack a foundation in data or analysis.

I’ve always disliked the idea behind “HIPPOs” – with its Dilbertian assumption that executives are idiots. That isn’t (mostly) my experience at all. But analytics does suffer from what might be described as “virtue” syndrome – the idea that something (say taxes or abstinence) is good for everyone else but not necessarily for me. Just as creative folks tend to think that what they do can’t be driven by analytics, so too is there a perception that strategic decisions must inevitably be more imaginative and intuitive and less number-driven than many decisions further down in the enterprise.

This isn’t completely wrong though it probably short-sells those mid-level decisions. Building good creative takes…creativity. It can’t be churned out by machine. Ditto for strategic decisions. There is NEVER enough information to fully determine a complex strategic decision at the enterprise level.

This doesn’t mean that data isn’t useful or should not be a driver for strategic decisions (and for creative content too). Instinct only works when it’s deeply informed about reality. Nobody has instincts in the abstract. To make a good strategic decision, a decision-maker MUST have certain kinds of data to hand and without that data, there’s nothing on which intuition, knowledge and experience can operate.

What data does a digital decision-maker need for driving strategy?

Key audiences. Customer Journey. Drivers of decision. Competitive choices.

You need to know who your audiences are and what makes them distinct. You need (as described in the last post) to understand the different journeys those audiences take and what journeys they like to take. You need to understand why they make the choices they make – what drives them to choose one product or service or another. Things like demand elasticity, brand awareness, and drivers of choice at each journey stage are critical. And, of course, you need to understand when and why those choices might favor the competition.

None of this stuff will make a strategic decision for you. It won’t tell you how much to invest in digital. Whether or not to build a mobile app. Whether personalization will provide high returns.

But without fully understanding audience, journey, drivers of decision and competitive choices, how can ANY digital decision-maker possibly arrive at an informed strategy? They can’t. And, in fact, they don’t. Because for the vast majority of enteprises, none of this information is part-and-parcel of the information environment.

I’ve seen plenty of executive dashboards that are supposed to help people run their business. They don’t have any of this stuff. I’ve seen the “four personas” puffery that’s supposed to help decision-makers understand their audience. I’ve seen how limited is the exposure executives have to journey mapping and how little it is deployed on a day-to-day basis. Worst of all, I’ve seen how absolutely pathetic is the use of voice of customer (online and offline) to help decision-makers understand why customers make the choices they do.

Voice of customer as it exists today is almost exclusively concerned with measuring customer satisfaction. There’s nothing wrong with measuring NPS or satisfaction. But these measures tell you nothing that will help define a strategy. They are at best (and they are often deeply flawed here too) measures of scoreboard – whether or not you are succeeding in a strategy.

I’m sure that people will object that knowing whether or not a strategy is succeeding is important. It is. It’s even a core part of ongoing strategy development. However, when divorced from particular customer journeys, NPS is essentially meaningless and uninterpretable. And while it truly is critical to measure whether or not a strategy is succeeding, it’s even more important to have data to help shape that strategy in the first place.

Executives just don’t get that context from their analytics teams. At best, they get little pieces of it in dribs and drabs. It is never – as it ought to be – the constant ongoing lifeblood of decision-making.

I subtitled this post “The Role of Voice of Customer in Enterprise Analytics” because of all the different types of information that can help make strategic decisions better, VoC is by far the most important. A good VoC program collects information from every channel: online and offline surveys, call-center, site feedback, social media, etc. It provides a continuing, detailed and sliceable view of audience, journey distribution and (partly) success. It’s by far the best way to help decision-makers understand why customers are making the choices they are, whether those choices are evolving, and how those choices are playing out across the competitive set. In short, it answers the majority of the questions that ought to be on the minds of decision-makers crafting a digital strategy.

This is a very different sort of executive dashboard than we typically see. It’s a true customer insights dashboard. It’s also fundamentally different than almost ANY VoC dashboard we see at any level. The vast majority of VoC reporting doesn’t provide slice-and-dice by audience and use-case – a capability which is absolutely essential to useful VoC reporting. VoC reporting is almost never based on and tied into a journey model so that the customer insights data is immediately reflective of journey stage and actionable arena. And VoC reporting almost never includes a continuous focus on exploring customer decision-making and tying that into the performance of actual initiatives.

It isn’t just a matter of a dashboard. One of the most unique and powerful aspects of digital voice-of-customer is the flexibility it provides to rapidly, efficiently and at very little cost tackle new problems. VoC should be a core part of executive decision-making with a constant cadence of research, analysis, discussion and reporting driven by specific business questions. This open and continuing dialog where VoC is a tool for decision-making is critical to integrating analytics into decisioning. If senior folks aren’t asking for new VoC research on a constant basis, you aren’t doing it right. The single best indicator of a robust VoC program in digital is the speed with which it changes.

Sadly, what decision-makers mostly get right now (if they get anything at all) is a high-level, non-segmented view of audience demographics, an occasional glimpse into high-level decision-factors that is totally divorced from both segment and journey stage, and an overweening focus on a scoreboard metric like NPS.

It’s no wonder, given such thin gruel, that decision-makers aren’t using data for strategic decisions better. If our executives mostly aren’t Dilbertian, they aren’t miracle workers either. They can’t make wine out of information water. If we want analytics to support strategy – and I assume we all do – then building a completely different sort of VoC program is the single best place to start. It isn’t everything. There are other types of data (behavioral, benchmark, econometric, etc.) that can be hugely helpful in shaping digital strategies. But a good VoC program is a huge step forward – a step forward that, if well executed – has the power to immediately transform how the digital enterprise thinks and works.

 

This is probably my last post of the year – so see you in 2016! In the meantime, my book Measuring the Digital World is now available. Could be a great way to spend your holiday down time (ideally while your resting up from time on the slopes)! Have a great holiday…