Digital Transformation of the Enterprise (with a side of Big Data)

Since I finished Measuring the Digital World and got back to regular blogging, I’ve been writing an extended series on the challenges of digital in the enterprise. Like many analysts, I’m often frustrated by the way our clients approach decision-making. So often, they lack any real understanding of the customer journey, any effective segmentation scheme, any real method for either doing or incorporating analytics into their decisioning, anything more than a superficial understanding of their customers, and anything more than the empty façade of a testing program. Is it any surprise that they aren’t very good at digital? This would be frustrating but understandable if companies simply didn’t invest in these capabilities. They aren’t magic, and no large enterprise can do these things without making a significant investment. But, in fact, many companies have invested plenty with very disappointing results. That’s maddening. I want to change that – and this series is an extended meditation on what it takes to do better and how large enterprises might truly gain competitive advantage in digital.

I hope that reading these posts is useful to people, but I know, too, that it’s hard to get the time. Heaven knows I struggle to read the stuff I’d like to. So I took advantage of the slow time over the holidays to do something that’s been on my wish list for about 2 years now – take some of the presentations I do and turn them into full online webinars. I started with a whole series that captures the core elements of this series – the challenge of digital transformation.

There are two versions of this video series. The first is a set of fairly short (2-4 minute) stories that walk through how enterprise decision-making gets done, what’s wrong with the way we do it, and how we can do better. It’s a ten(!) part series and meant to be tackled in order. It’s not really all that long…like I said, most of the videos are just 2-4 minutes long. I’ve also packaged up the whole story (except Part 10) in single video that runs just a little over 20 minutes. It’s shorter than viewing all 10 of the others, but you need a decent chunk of uninterrupted time to get at it. If you’re really pressed and only want to get the key themes without the story, you can just view Parts 8-10.

Here’s the video page that has all of these laid out in order:

Digital Transformation Video Series

Check it out and let me know what you think! To me it seems like a faster, better, and more enjoyable way to get the story about digital transformation and I’m hoping it’s very shareable as well. If you’re struggling to get analytics traction in your organization, these videos might be an easy thing to share with your CMO and digital channel leads to help drive real change.

I have to say I enjoyed doing these a lot and they aren’t really hard to do. They aren’t quite professional quality, but I think they are very listenable and I’ll keep working to make them better. In fact, I enjoyed doing the digital transformation ones so much that I knocked out another this last week – Big Data Explained.

This is one of my favorite presentations of all time – it’s rich in content and intellectually interesting. Big data is a subject that is obscured by hype, self-interest, and just plain ignorance; everyone talks about it but no one has a clear, cogent explanation of what it is and why it’s important. This presentation deconstructs the everyday explanation about big data (the 4Vs) and shows why it misses the mark. But it isn’t designed to merely expose the hype, it actually builds out a clear, straightforward and important explanation of why big data is real, why it challenges common IT and analytics paradigms, and how to understand whether a problem is a big data problem…or not. I’ve written about this before, but you can’t beat a video with supporting visuals for this particular topic. It’s less than fifteen minutes and, like the digital transformation series, it’s intended for a wide audience. If you have decision-makers who don’t get big data or are skeptical of the hype, they’ll appreciate this straightforward, clear, and no-nonsense explication of what it is.

You can get it on my video page or direct on Youtube

This is also a significant topic toward the end of Measuring the Digital World where I try to lay out a forward looking plan for digital analytics as a discipline.

I’m planning to do a steady stream of these videos throughout the year so I’d love thoughts/feedback if you have suggestions!

Next week I hope to have an update on my EY Counseling Family’s work in the 538 Academy Awards challenge. We’ve built our initial Hollywood culture models – it’s pretty cool stuff and I’m excited to share the results. Our model may not be as effective as some of the other challengers (TBD), but I think it’s definitely more fun.

Building Analytics Culture – One Decision at a Time

In my last post, I argued that much of what passes for “building culture” in corporate America is worthless. It’s all about talk. And whether that talk is about diversity, ethics or analytics, it’s equally arid. Because you don’t build culture by talking. You build culture though actions. By doing things right (or wrong if that’s the kind of culture you want). Not only are words not effective in building culture, they can be positively toxic. When words and actions don’t align, the dishonesty casts other – possibly more meaningful words – into disrepute. Think about which is worse – a culture where bribery is simply the accepted and normal way of getting things done (and is cheerfully acknowledged) and one where bribery is ubiquitous but is cloaked behind constant protestations of disinterest and honesty? If you’re not sure about your answer, take it down to a personal level and ask yourself the same question. Do we not like an honest villain better than a hypocrite? If hypocrisy is the compliment vice pays to virtue, it is a particularly nasty form of flattery.

What this means is that you can’t build an analytics culture by telling people to be data driven. You can’t build an analytics culture by touting the virtues of analysis. You can’t even build an analytics culture by hiring analysts. You build an analytics culture by making good (data-driven) decisions.

That’s the only way.

But how do you get an organization to make data-driven decisions? That’s the art of building culture. And in that last post, I laid out seven (a baker’s half-dozen?) tactics for building good decision-making habits: analytic reporting, analytics briefing sessions, hiring a C-Suite analytics advisor, creating measurement standards, building a rich meta-data system for campaigns and content, creating a rapid VoC capability and embracing a continuous improvement methodology like SPEED.

These aren’t just random parts of making analytic decisions. They are tactics that seem to me particularly effective in driving good habits in the organization and building the right kind of culture. But seven tactics doesn’t nearly exhaust my list. Here’s another set of techniques that are equally important in helping drive good decision-making in the organization (my original list wasn’t in any particular order so it’s not like the previous list had all the important stuff):

Yearly Agency Performance Measurement and Reviews

What it is: Having an independent annual analysis of your agency’s performance. This should include review of goals and metrics, consideration of the appropriateness of KPIs and analysis of variation in campaign performance along three dimensions (inside the campaign by element, over time, and across campaigns). This must not be done by the agency itself (duh!) or by the owners of the relationship.

Why it builds culture: Most agencies work by building strong personal relationships. There are times and ways that this can work in your favor, but from a cultural perspective it both limits and discourages analytic thinking. I see many enterprises where the agency is so strongly entrenched you literally cannot criticize them. Not only does the resulting marketing nearly always suck, but this drains the life out of an analytics culture. This is one of many ways in which building an analytic culture can conflict with other goals, but here I definitely believe analytics should win. You don’t need a too cozy relationship with your agency. You do need objective measurement of their performance.

 

Analytics Annotation / Collaboration Tool like Insight Rocket

What it is: A tool that provides a method for rich data annotation and the creation and distribution of analytic stories across the analytics team and into the organization. In Analytic Reporting, I argued for a focus on democratizing knowledge not data. Tools like Insight Rocket are a part of that strategy, since they provide a way to create and rapidly disseminate a layer of meaning on top of powerful data exploration tools like Tableau.

Why it builds culture: There aren’t that many places where technology makes much difference to culture, but there are a few. As some of my other suggestions make clear, you get better analytics culture the more you drive analytics across and into the organization (analytic reporting, C-Suite Advisor, SPEED, etc.). Tools like Insight Rocket have three virtues: they help disseminate analytics thinking not just data, they boost analytics collaboration making for better analytic teams, and they provide a repository of analytics which increases long-term leverage in the enterprise. Oh, here’s a fourth advantage, they force analysts to tell stories – meaning they have to engage with the business. That makes this piece of technology a really nice complement to my suggestion about a regular cadence of analytics briefings and a rare instance of technology deepening culture.

 

In-sourcing

What it is: Building analytics expertise internally instead of hiring it out and, most especially, instead of off-shoring it.

Why it builds culture: I’d be the last person to tell you that consulting shouldn’t have a role in the large enterprise. I’ve been a consultant for most of my working life. But we routinely advise our clients to change the way they think about consulting – to use it not as a replacement for an internal capability but as a bootstrap and supplement to that capability. If analytics is core to digital (and it is) and if digital is core to your business (which it probably is), then you need analytics to be part of your internal capability. Having strong, capable, influential on-shore employees who are analysts is absolutely necessary to analytics culture. I’ll add that while off-shoring, too, has a role, it’s a far more effective culture killer than normal consulting. Off-shoring creates a sharp divide between the analyst and the business that is fatal to good performance and good culture on EITHER side.

 

Learning-based Testing Plan

What it is: Testing plans that include significant focus on developing best design practices and resolving political issues instead of on micro-optimizations of the funnel.

Why it works: Testing is a way to make decisions. But as long as its primary use is to decide whether to show image A or image B or a button in this color or that color, it will never be used properly. To illustrate learning-based testing, I’ve used the example of video integration – testing different methods of on-page video integration, different lengths, different content types and different placements against each key segment and use-case to determine UI parameters for ALL future videos. When you test this way, you resolve hundreds of future questions and save endless future debate about what to do with this or that video. That’s learning based testing. It’s also about picking key places in the organization where political battles determine design – things like home page real-estate and the amount of advertising load on a page – and resolving them with testing; that’s learning based testing, too. Learning based testing builds culture in two ways. First, in and of itself, it drives analytic decision-making. Almost as important, it demonstrates the proper role of experimentation and should help set the table for decision-makers tests to ask for more interesting tests.

 

Control Groups

What it is: Use of control groups to measure effectiveness whenever new programs (operational or marketing) are implemented. Control groups use small population subsets chosen randomly from a target population who are given either no experience or a neutral (existing) experience instead. Nearly all tests feature a baseline control group as part of the test, but the use of control groups transcends A/B testing tools. Use of control groups common in traditional direct response marketing and can be used in a wide variety of on and offline contexts (most especially as I recently saw Elea Feit of Drexel hammer home at the DAA Symposium – as a much more effective approach to attribution).

Why it works: One of the real barriers to building culture is a classic problem in education. When you first teach students something, they almost invariably use it poorly. That can sour others on the value of the knowledge itself. When people in an organization first start using analytics, they are, quite inevitably, going to fall into the correlation trap. Correlation is not causation. But in many cases, it sure looks like it is and this leads to many, many bad decisions. How to prevent the most common error in analytics? Control groups. Control groups build culture because they get decision-makers thinking the right way about measurement and because they protect the organization from mistakes that will otherwise sour the culture on analytics.

 

Unified Success Framework

What it is: A standardized, pre-determined framework for content and campaign success measurement that includes definition of campaign types, description of key metrics for those types, and methods of comparing like campaigns on an apples-to-apples basis.

Why it works: You may not be able to make the horse drink, but leading it to water is a good start. A unified success framework puts rigor around success measurement – a critical part of building good analytics culture. On the producer side, it forces the analytics team to make real decisions about what matters and, one hopes, pushes them to prove that proxy measures (such as engagement) are real. On the consumer side, it prevents that most insidious destroyer of analytics culture, the post hoc success analysis. If you can pick your success after the game is over, you’ll always win.

 

The Enterprise VoC Dashboard

What it is: An enterprise-wide state-of-the-customer dashboard that provides a snapshot and trended look at how customer attitudes are evolving. It should include built in segmentation so that attitudinal views are ALWAYS shown sliced by key customer types with additional segmentation possible.

Why it works: There are so many good things going on here that it’s hard to enumerate them all. First, this type of dashboard is one of the best ways to distill customer-first thinking in the organization. You can’t think customer-first, until you know what the customer thinks. Second, this type of dashboard enforces a segmented view of the world. Segmentation is fundamental to critical thinking about digital problems and this sets the table for better questions and better answers in the organization. Third, opinion data is easier to absorb and use than behavioral data, making this type of dashboard particularly valuable for encouraging decision-makers to use analytics.

 

Two-Tiered Segmentation

What it is: A method that creates two-levels of segmentation in the digital channel. The first level is the traditional “who” someone is – whether in terms of persona or business relationship or key demographics. The second level captures “what” they are trying to accomplish. Each customer touch-point can be described in this type of segmentation as the intersection of who a visitor is and what their visit was for.

Why it works: Much like the VoC Dashboard, Two-Tiered Segmentation makes for dramatically better clarity around digital channel decision-making and evaluation of success. Questions like ‘Is our Website successful?’ get morphed into the much more tractable and analyzable question ‘Is our Website successful for this audience trying to do this task?’. That’s a much better question and big part of building analytics culture is getting people to ask better questions. This also happens to be the main topic of my book “Measuring the Digital World” and in it you can get a full description of both the power and the methods behind Two-Tiered Segmentation.

 

I have more, but I’m going to roll the rest into my next post on building an agile organization since they are all deeply related to the integration of capabilities in the organization. Still, that’s fifteen different tactics for building culture. None of which include mission statements, organizational alignment or C-Level support (okay, Walking the Walk is kind of that but not exactly and I didn’t include it in the fifteen) and none of which will take place in corporate retreats or all-hands conferences. That’s a good thing and makes me believe they might actually work.

Ask yourself this: is it possible to imagine an organization that does even half these things and doesn’t have a great analytics culture? I don’t think it is. Because culture just is the sum of the way your organization works and these are powerful drivers of good analytic thinking. You can imagine an organization that does these things and isn’t friendly, collaborative, responsible, flat, diverse, caring or even innovative. There are all kinds of culture, and good decision-making isn’t the only aspect of culture to care about*. But if you do these things, you will have an organization that makes consistently good decisions.

*Incidentally, if you want to build culture in any of these other ways, you have to think about similar approaches. Astronomers have a clever technique for seeing very faint objects called averted vision. The idea is that you look just to the side of the object if you want to get the most light-gathering power from your eyes. It’s the same with culture. You can’t tackle it head-on by talking about it. You have to build it just a little from the side!

Practical Steps to Building an Analytics Culture

Building an analytics culture in the enterprise is incredibly important. It’s far more important than any single capability, technology or technique. But building culture isn’t easy. You can’t buy it. You can’t proclaim it. You can’t implement it.

There is, of course, a vast literature on building culture in the enterprise. But if the clumsy, heavy-handed, thoroughly useless attempts to “build culture” that I’ve witnessed over the course of my working life are any evidence, that body of literature is nearly useless.

Here’s one thing I know for sure: you don’t build culture by talk. I don’t care whether it’s getting teenagers to practice safe-sex or getting managers to use analytics, preaching virtue doesn’t work, has never worked and will never work. Telling people to be data-driven, proclaiming your commitment to analytics, touting your analytics capabilities: none of this builds analytics culture.

If there’s one thing that every young employee has learned in this era, it’s that fancy talk is cheap and meaningless. People are incredibly sophisticated about language these days. We can sit in front of the TV and recognize in a second whether we’re seeing a commercial or a program. Most of us can tell the difference between a TV show and movie almost at a glance. We can tune out advertising on a Website as effortlessly as we put on our pants. A bunch of glib words aren’t going to fool anyone. You want to know what the reaction is to your carefully crafted, strategic consultancy driven mission statement or that five year “vision” you spent millions on and just rolled out with a cool video at your Sales Conference? Complete indifference.

That’s if you’re lucky…if you didn’t do it really well, you got the eye-roll.

But it isn’t just that people are incredibly sensitive – probably too sensitive – to BS. It’s that even true, sincere, beautifully reasoned words will not build culture. Reading moral philosophy does not create moral students. Not because the words aren’t right or true, but because behaviors are, for the most part, not driven by those types of reasons.

That’s the whole thing about culture.

Culture is lived, not read or spoken. To create it, you have to ingrain it in people’s thinking. If you want a data-driven organization, you have to create good analytic habits. You have to make the organization (and you too) work right.

How do you do that?

You do it by creating certain kinds of process and behaviors that embed analytic thinking. Do enough of that, and you’ll have an analytic culture. I guarantee it. The whole thrust of this recent series of posts is that by changing the way you integrate analytics, voice-of-customer, journey-mapping and experimentation into the enterprise, you can drive better digital decision making. That’s building culture. It’s my big answer to the question of how you build analytics culture.

But I have some small answers as well. Here, in no particular order, are practical ways you can create importantly good analytics habits in the enterprise.

Analytic Reporting

What it is: Changing your enterprise reporting strategy by moving from reports to tools. Analytic models and forecasting allow you to build tools that integrate historical reporting with forecasting and what-if capabilities. Static reporting is replaced by a set of interactive tools that allow users to see how different business strategies actually play-out.

Why it build analytics culture: With analytics reporting, you democratize knowledge not data. It makes all the difference in the world. The analytic models capture your best insight into how a key business works and what levers drive performance. Building this into tools not only operationalizes the knowledge, it creates positive feedback loops to analytics. When the forecast isn’t right, everyone know it and the business is incented to improve its understanding and predictive capabilities. This makes for better culture in analytics consumers and analytics producers.

 

Cadence of Communications

What it is: Setting up regular briefings between analytics and your senior team and decision-makers. This can include review of dashboards but should primarily focus on answers to previous business questions and discussion of new problems.

Why it builds analytics culture: This is actually one of the most important things you can do. It exposes decision-makers to analytics. It makes it easy for decision-makers to ask for new research and exposes them to the relevant techniques. Perhaps even more important, it lets decision-makers drive the analytics agenda, exposes analysts to real business problems, and forces analysts to develop better communication skills.

 

C-Suite Advisor

What it is: Create an Analytics Minister-without-portfolio whose sole job is to advise senior decision-makers on how to use, understand and evaluate the analytics, the data and the decisions they get.

Why it builds analytics culture: Most senior executives are fairly ignorant of the pitfalls in data interpretation and the ins-and-outs of KPIs and experimentation. You can’t send them back to get a modern MBA, but you can give them a trusted advisor with no axe to grind. This not only raises their analytics intelligence, it forces everyone feeding them information to up their game as well. This tactic is also critical because of the next strategy…

 

Walking the Walk

What it is: Senior Leaders can talk tell they are blue in the face about data-driven decision-making. Nobody will care. But let a Senior Leader even once use data or demand data around a decision they are making and the whole organization will take notice.

Why it builds analytics culture: Senior leaders CAN and DO have a profound impact on culture but they do so by their behavior not their words. When the leaders at the top use and demand data for decisions, so will everyone else.

 

Tagging Standards

What it is: A clearly defined set of data collection specifications that ensure that every piece of content on every platform is appropriately tagged to collect a rich set of customer, content, and behavioral data.

Why it builds analytics culture: This ends the debate over whether tags and measurement are optional. They aren’t. This also, interestingly, makes measurement easier. Sometimes, people just need to be told what to do. This is like choosing which side of the road to drive on – it’s far more important that you have a standard that which side of the road you pick. Standards are necessary when an organization needs direction and coordination. Tagging is a perfect example.

 

CMS and Campaign Meta-Data

What it is: The definition of and governance around the creation of campaign and content meta-data. Every piece of content and every campaign element should have detailed, rich meta-data around the audience, tone, approach, contents, and every other element that can be tuned and analyzed.

Why it builds analytics culture: Not only is meta-data the key to digital analytics – providing the meaning that makes content consumption understandable, but rich meta-data definition guides useful thought. These are the categories people will think about when they analyze content and campaign performance. That’s as it should be and by providing these pre-built, populated categorizations, you’ll greatly facilitate good analytics thinking.

 

Rapid VoC

What it is: The technical and organizational capability to rapidly create, deploy and analyze surveys and other voice-of-customer research instruments.

Why it builds analytics culture: This is the best capability I know for training senior decision-makers to use research. It’s so cheap, so easy, so flexible and so understandable that decision-makers will quickly get spoiled. They’ll use it over and over and over. Well – that’s the point. Nothing builds analytics muscle like use and getting this type of capability deeply embedded in the way your senior team thinks and works will truly change the decision-making culture of the enterprise.

 

SPEED and Formal Continuous Improvement Cycles

What it is: The use of a formal methodology for digital improvement. SPEED provides a way to identify the best opportunities for digital improvement, the ways to tackle those opportunities, and the ability to measure the impact of any changes. It’s the equivalent of Six Sigma for digital.

Why it builds analytics culture: Formal methods make it vastly easier for everyone in the organization to understand how to get better. Methods also help define a set of processes that organizations can build their organization around. This makes it easier to grow and scale. For large enterprises, in particular, it’s no surprise that formal methodologies like Six Sigma have been so successful. They make key cultural precepts manifest and attach processes to them so that the organizational inertia is guided in positive directions.

 

Does this seem like an absurdly long list? In truth I’m only about half-way through. But this post is getting LONG. So I’m going to save the rest of my list for next week. Till then, here’s some final thoughts on creating an analytics culture.

The secret to building culture is this: everything you do builds culture. Some things build the wrong kind of culture. Some things the right kind. But you are never not building culture. So if you want to build the right culture to be good at digital and decision-making, there’s no magic elixir, no secret sauce. There is only the discipline of doing things right. Over and over.

That being said, not every action is equal. Some foods are empty of nutrition but empty, too, of harm. Others positively destroy your teeth or your waistline. Still others provide the right kind of fuel. The things I’ve described above are not just a random list of things done right, they are the small to medium things that, done right, have the biggest impacts I’ve seen on building a great digital and analytics culture. They are also targeted to places and decisions which, done poorly, will deeply damage your culture.

I’ll detail some more super-foods for analytics culture in my next post!

 

[Get your copy of Measuring the Digital World – the definitive guide to the discipline of digital analytics – to learn more].